$99
Audio course + Vocab 1,500

Audio Course for Beginners Russian Path - Russian audio course for beginners

Details

1.   To be able to participate in a daily conversation in Russian, you need to know 70% of the whole Russian grammar system. For example, to say a phrase as simple as “I need to buy food”, you need to know such grammar concepts as the Idea of Recipient, the Perfective aspect of the Verb in the Infinitive and the Idea of Direct Object (and maybe also the Idea of Partitive Meaning if you want to say “some food”).

2.
    Russian Grammar System (i.e. the logic of the Russian language) is very different from the logic of English and other Romano-Germanic languages. In Russian we don’t have such a branchy system of Verb Tenses as English speakers have, but we have Imperfective and Perfective Aspects of Verbs, which is a completely different manner of “seeing” things and expressing them in a language.
Because the Russian grammar concepts are so different to what most learners have in their native language, students require explicit explanations of these concepts. Normally, they can’t figure them out on their own from context.

3.   The number of grammatical forms that express a particular grammar concept is large in Russian. For example, the Idea of Recipient is effectuated by the Dative Case, and the endings of the words in Dative vary depending on whether the word is a Noun or an Adjective, Singular or Plural, Masculine, Feminine or Neutral. After the students get an explanation of a Grammar Concept/Idea, they need to practice a lot more than, for example, the English language learners to memorize the forms and endings of the Russian words.The 3 reasons mentioned above make it almost impossible to avoid explicit grammar studies at the beginner level of learning Russian.

–  In my audio lessons I explain everything so clearly that you will understand the Russian Grammar Concept / Idea from the first showing. After you have understood the Concept / Idea, you will be presented real authentic dialogues where this Concept / Idea gets effectuated.
   Authentic dialogues built according to the explained pattern will give you the chance to review the Russian Grammar Concept / Idea multiple times, which will help your brain get used to the new Concept / Idea and make it part of your Russian language neural network.
–  Each authentic dialogue is accompanied with literal translation into English, which helps your brain switch from thinking in English to thinking in Russian.

Most popular Russian audio courses use the spaced repetition technique, which just drills the Russian language structures into your brain without explaining the logic of them. However, there have been studies which proved that the brain of an adult person memorizes things better if their logic gets explained to it. In my audio course I give a profound explanation of each new Russian Grammar Concept / Idea and then reinforce it with repetitive dialogues.

There is also a large number of audio courses that are just audio phrasebooks. They don’t use the spaced repetition technique; they are just a collection of various phrases pull out of most common communication situations (e.g., situations while travelling, at the restaurant, when introducing yourself, etc.). Such courses don’t teach you the Russian language because those rigid phrases will never help you build a brand new LIVE neural network in your brain. The only thing that those phrases are useful for is one-time situational solutions, but they won’t help you become fluent in the Russian language. Personally, I think that such “phrasebook courses” should not cost much, and I personally give them away for free (you can find around 1,000 “situational” phrases on my second YouTube channel called “Russian Tutor”).

This audio course will help you make the right start in learning Russian by helping you start building your Russian neural network. This course is condensed from my experience in working with beginners and it will help you save up to 20 one-on-one lessons with ARusPro tutors.

Many learners mistakenly think that when an adult’s brain is learning a new language, it is repeating the same process it did in childhood when learning their mother tongue. Learners mistakenly think that ample and repetitive input of language material without much analysis will evoke the same powers that helped your brain learn your first language. These “powers” are normally associated with your subconsciousness, which is considered the place where the language acquisition happens.

In these learners’ point of view, learning a language on your conscious level (through explicit explanations and studying the grammar theory) does not lead to the actual language acquisition (in other words, you get the knowledge ABOUT the language, but you don’t learn to actually use it / speak it). The main argument of such learners is that children never study the theory of the language; they just perceive it (get a lot of input) and then start speaking it.

Advocates of such views don’t take into account one fact. The language acquisition really takes place in a person’s subconsciousness (i.e., in order to start speaking a language, its structures, concepts and ideas should “fall down” to the subconscious level). However, in the brain of an adult person they first need to go through the “consciousness checkpoint” where the brain switches their status from “alien” to “our own”.

A child’s brain is “tabula rasa”. It perceives any structures, concepts and ideas as “its own” from the start, from the first hearing. It doesn’t have a system of different structures, concepts and ideas that interfere with the newcomers. When a child acquires his/her first language, the structures, concepts and ideas “fall” directly to his/her subconsciousness, and then the formula is indeed very simple: a lot of “input” eventually leads to a perfect native-level “output”. What we have in an adult’s brain is an already well-established, well-functioning and very logical system of the mother tongue, so when a foreign language Concept / Idea comes in with no analysis, it is always perceived as an alien and is cast out as something strange, unknown and illogical, something that the brain cannot fit into the well-functioning system of its native language. Only when the brain gives a new Concept / Idea a good check-up and analysis, only when it sniffs around it like a dog to make sure it’s not dangerous, the new Concept / Idea can be let into the subconsciousness.

As I mentioned before, the Russian Language Concepts / Ideas are very different from those of most European languages, so it takes some time for an adult’s brain to do the check-up and get used to them. That is why the logic of all Russian Grammar Concepts / Ideas should be explained to adult students first for their brain to analyze them and make sure they are “safe”, and only then we can start the process of “welcoming” the new Concepts / Ideas into the “sanctuary” – subconsciousness (by exposing students to authentic language material and doing various exercises to help the Concepts / Ideas fall down there).

21 audio lessons + 23 vocabulary MP3 files will teach you…

…in terms of grammar:

1)  Genders of Russian nouns and their Plural forms.
2)  The most needed at the beginner’s level meanings of 5 Russian cases.
3)  Present, Past and Future Tenses of Russian verbs accompanied by proper contexts. 1st and 2nd Conjugation of Verbs + Irregular Verbs.
4)  The basics of Russian sentence structure (and how it is different from the English sentence structure).
5)  Explanations of “confusing little words” (so that you can use them to sound like a Russian).
6)  The secret of understanding the uniques Russian Language Concepts and Ideas – the ones that will help you start “looking” at the world like Russians do (“in my universe”, the Idea of “recipient”, “the objective pressing factor” and others).
7)  How to use the unique Russian constructions in the Past and Future Tenses (you will not find this information in any other audio course and very rarely in grammar books!!!)
8)  How to “bypass” the Russian Verbs of Motion at the beginner’s level.

…  in terms of communication tasks:

1)  How to introduce yourself, talk about yourself and your country and ask your conversational partner questions about themselves and their country.
2)  Express your opinion on different things and talk about your preferences.
3)  Order food in a restaurant and offer food.
4)  Buy things at the store.
5)  Talk about weather.
6)  Talk about the events of the past and make plans for the future.
7)
  Ask about the location of something and ask for directions.

Buy now button for ARusPro 400x122 1 - Russian audio course for beginners

$99
Audio course + Vocab 1,500

Audio Course for Beginners Russian Path - Russian audio course for beginners

Details

1.   To be able to participate in a daily conversation in Russian, you need to know 70% of the whole Russian grammar system. For example, to say a phrase as simple as “I need to buy food”, you need to know such grammar concepts as the Idea of Recipient, the Perfective aspect of the Verb in the Infinitive and the Idea of Direct Object (and maybe also the Idea of Partitive Meaning if you want to say “some food”).

2.
    Russian Grammar System (i.e. the logic of the Russian language) is very different from the logic of English and other Romano-Germanic languages. In Russian we don’t have such a branchy system of Verb Tenses as English speakers have, but we have Imperfective and Perfective Aspects of Verbs, which is a completely different manner of “seeing” things and expressing them in a language.
Because the Russian grammar concepts are so different to what most learners have in their native language, students require explicit explanations of these concepts. Normally, they can’t figure them out on their own from context.

3.   The number of grammatical forms that express a particular grammar concept is large in Russian. For example, the Idea of Recipient is effectuated by the Dative Case, and the endings of the words in Dative vary depending on whether the word is a Noun or an Adjective, Singular or Plural, Masculine, Feminine or Neutral. After the students get an explanation of a Grammar Concept/Idea, they need to practice a lot more than, for example, the English language learners to memorize the forms and endings of the Russian words.The 3 reasons mentioned above make it almost impossible to avoid explicit grammar studies at the beginner level of learning Russian.

–  In my audio lessons I explain everything so clearly that you will understand the Russian Grammar Concept / Idea from the first showing. After you have understood the Concept / Idea, you will be presented real authentic dialogues where this Concept / Idea gets effectuated.
   Authentic dialogues built according to the explained pattern will give you the chance to review the Russian Grammar Concept / Idea multiple times, which will help your brain get used to the new Concept / Idea and make it part of your Russian language neural network.
–  Each authentic dialogue is accompanied with literal translation into English, which helps your brain switch from thinking in English to thinking in Russian.

Most popular Russian audio courses use the spaced repetition technique, which just drills the Russian language structures into your brain without explaining the logic of them. However, there have been studies which proved that the brain of an adult person memorizes things better if their logic gets explained to it. In my audio course I give a profound explanation of each new Russian Grammar Concept / Idea and then reinforce it with repetitive dialogues.

There is also a large number of audio courses that are just audio phrasebooks. They don’t use the spaced repetition technique; they are just a collection of various phrases pull out of most common communication situations (e.g., situations while travelling, at the restaurant, when introducing yourself, etc.). Such courses don’t teach you the Russian language because those rigid phrases will never help you build a brand new LIVE neural network in your brain. The only thing that those phrases are useful for is one-time situational solutions, but they won’t help you become fluent in the Russian language. Personally, I think that such “phrasebook courses” should not cost much, and I personally give them away for free (you can find around 1,000 “situational” phrases on my second YouTube channel called “Russian Tutor”).

This audio course will help you make the right start in learning Russian by helping you start building your Russian neural network. This course is condensed from my experience in working with beginners and it will help you save up to 20 one-on-one lessons with ARusPro tutors.

Many learners mistakenly think that when an adult’s brain is learning a new language, it is repeating the same process it did in childhood when learning their mother tongue. Learners mistakenly think that ample and repetitive input of language material without much analysis will evoke the same powers that helped your brain learn your first language. These “powers” are normally associated with your subconsciousness, which is considered the place where the language acquisition happens.

In these learners’ point of view, learning a language on your conscious level (through explicit explanations and studying the grammar theory) does not lead to the actual language acquisition (in other words, you get the knowledge ABOUT the language, but you don’t learn to actually use it / speak it). The main argument of such learners is that children never study the theory of the language; they just perceive it (get a lot of input) and then start speaking it.

Advocates of such views don’t take into account one fact. The language acquisition really takes place in a person’s subconsciousness (i.e., in order to start speaking a language, its structures, concepts and ideas should “fall down” to the subconscious level). However, in the brain of an adult person they first need to go through the “consciousness checkpoint” where the brain switches their status from “alien” to “our own”.

A child’s brain is “tabula rasa”. It perceives any structures, concepts and ideas as “its own” from the start, from the first hearing. It doesn’t have a system of different structures, concepts and ideas that interfere with the newcomers. When a child acquires his/her first language, the structures, concepts and ideas “fall” directly to his/her subconsciousness, and then the formula is indeed very simple: a lot of “input” eventually leads to a perfect native-level “output”. What we have in an adult’s brain is an already well-established, well-functioning and very logical system of the mother tongue, so when a foreign language Concept / Idea comes in with no analysis, it is always perceived as an alien and is cast out as something strange, unknown and illogical, something that the brain cannot fit into the well-functioning system of its native language. Only when the brain gives a new Concept / Idea a good check-up and analysis, only when it sniffs around it like a dog to make sure it’s not dangerous, the new Concept / Idea can be let into the subconsciousness.

As I mentioned before, the Russian Language Concepts / Ideas are very different from those of most European languages, so it takes some time for an adult’s brain to do the check-up and get used to them. That is why the logic of all Russian Grammar Concepts / Ideas should be explained to adult students first for their brain to analyze them and make sure they are “safe”, and only then we can start the process of “welcoming” the new Concepts / Ideas into the “sanctuary” – subconsciousness (by exposing students to authentic language material and doing various exercises to help the Concepts / Ideas fall down there).

21 audio lessons + 23 vocabulary MP3 files will teach you…

…in terms of grammar:

1)  Genders of Russian nouns and their Plural forms.
2)  The most needed at the beginner’s level meanings of 5 Russian cases.
3)  Present, Past and Future Tenses of Russian verbs accompanied by proper contexts. 1st and 2nd Conjugation of Verbs + Irregular Verbs.
4)  The basics of Russian sentence structure (and how it is different from the English sentence structure).
5)  Explanations of “confusing little words” (so that you can use them to sound like a Russian).
6)  The secret of understanding the uniques Russian Language Concepts and Ideas – the ones that will help you start “looking” at the world like Russians do (“in my universe”, the Idea of “recipient”, “the objective pressing factor” and others).
7)  How to use the unique Russian constructions in the Past and Future Tenses (you will not find this information in any other audio course and very rarely in grammar books!!!)
8)  How to “bypass” the Russian Verbs of Motion at the beginner’s level.

…  in terms of communication tasks:

1)  How to introduce yourself, talk about yourself and your country and ask your conversational partner questions about themselves and their country.
2)  Express your opinion on different things and talk about your preferences.
3)  Order food in a restaurant and offer food.
4)  Buy things at the store.
5)  Talk about weather.
6)  Talk about the events of the past and make plans for the future.
7)
  Ask about the location of something and ask for directions.

Buy now button for ARusPro 400x122 1 - Russian audio course for beginners